Wandering the streets of Cuzco

Sunday Morning. No Lambs. Few People. Sunday morning I ventured out from Ecopackers and headed to the Plaza de Armas where I’d seen all the lamb-carrying Peruvians just a few days before. This time, I brought plenty of sole coins to give to the ladies and girls in exchange for taking their pictures. Unlike 2 days before, nary a one was to be found. Even as tour buses began to arrive around noon, no colorfully-dressed anyone was to be found anywhere. These two off the internet are the best I can do:

lambs

Cusco. This World Heritage city is visually interesting, even if the Spanish stonework falls short of Incan handiwork. Many of the buildings in Cuzco have been around for over nine centuries, dating back to the days of the Inca Empire and before. A blend of Incan foundations and colonial toppings can be seen everywhere, thanks to the Conquistadors.

Touristy, but not bad-touristy. Cuzco serves as the highland hub for excursions to Machu Picchu and the Inca Trail, so it’s quite touristy. The upside is that most locals are used to visitors and are very helpful, welcoming and friendly. While I waited for the lamb people to show up (which they never did), I wandered around central Cuzco near the Plaza de Armas:

Narrow road close to the Plaza de Armas in Cusco, Peru.

Narrow road close to the Plaza de Armas in Cusco, Peru.

Road leading to the Plaza de Armas.

Road leading to the Plaza de Armas.

Door on the Cathedral of Santo Domingo.

Door on the Cathedral of Santo Domingo.

Cathedral of Santo Domingo on the Avenida de Sol in  Cusco, Peru.

Cathedral of Santo Domingo on the Avenida de Sol in Cusco, Peru.

Schoolgirls outside the Cathedral of Santo Domingo .

Schoolgirls outside the Cathedral of Santo Domingo .

One of many blue doors in Cusco, Peru.

One of many blue doors in Cusco, Peru.

Another blue door in Cusco, Peru.

Another blue door in Cusco, Peru.

Weathered door close to Plaza de Armas in Cusco, Peru.

Weathered door close to Plaza de Armas in Cusco, Peru.

The 7-color rainbow flag in Peru represents Tawantin Suyu (Inca territory.)

The 7-color rainbow flag in Peru represents Tawantin Suyu (Inca territory.)

Arbitrary wall in Cusco, Peru.

Arbitrary wall in Cusco, Peru.

Narrow street in Central Cusco.

Narrow street in Central Cusco.

Narrow road near central Cusco.

Narrow road near central Cusco.

Bye, Cusco. Just after noon, a Condor Travel rep met me at Ecopackers and took me to the Cusco airport. Six not-too-long hours later, I was back at Fiona’s in a nice, hot shower.

One thought on “Wandering the streets of Cuzco

  1. Oh look, it’s me on a daily basis except a different tartan. And I’m not South American. And my pinafore stops above my knee.

    I love all of the doors!

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